Distracted Driving Law

Kennady Christensen, Section Reporter

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  On October 1, 2017, a new law was put into effect. It was the Distracted Driving Law. This law states that drivers can not touch their phones while driving. I understand that people shouldn’t touch their phones while driving, but do we really have a need for the law?

There has already been a version of this law that was put into effect back in 2009, stating that people can’t text and drive. The earlier law only prevented people from texting or calling, which left room for people to play games on their phones without getting in trouble for it.

I am sure that most people know at least one person who does text and drive.  If that person got caught multiple times, it could be a $500 fine. With the new law, if someone gets caught multiple times, they can get a fine of $2,000.

It is not just texting and driving that will get drivers in trouble with the law, it is also putting on makeup and even reading a book while driving. I am sure that whatever the driver wants to do, that isn’t focusing on the road can wait until the car is safely parked.

Since the fines are now bigger, I think that it will stop a lot of people from using their phones, books, or even putting on makeup while driving, because not much people would want a fine of $2,000. What if some don’t care about the fine? What will happen? Well, getting caught could mean possible jail time. But worse, “More than 11 people die, and 2,800 people get injured from distracted driving in Oregon each year,” According to Whitney M. Woodworth, so death is also a possibility.

So I think that the law was a pretty good idea, and we definitely have a need for it. Maybe not everyone thinks that this law is a good idea, but I think that this law can save lives.

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Distracted Driving Law